Bolch Judicial Institute
Bolch Judicial Institute

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The Judges’ roundtable

Posted on December 6, 2013

FIFTEEN JUDGES FROM U.S. FEDERAL AND STATE COURTS and two more jurists from Canada and Ghana, respectively, convened at Duke Law in mid-May for their second session of studies in the Master of Judicial Studies pro­gram. Their curriculum over four weeks included rigorous courses on the use of foreign law in U.S. courts; administrative law, Continue Reading »

Federal Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure opens “Duke Rules Package” for comment

Posted on August 22, 2013

A package of proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure which could profoundly affect litigation practice originated during a 2010 conference at Duke Law School. The “Duke Rules Package” was released by the Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure of the Judicial Conference of the United States earlier this month; the proposals Continue Reading »

Center for Judicial Studies’ Patent Law Institute offers intensive program on America Invents Act

Posted on June 17, 2013

Duke’s Center for Judicial Studies hosted the Patent Law Institute May 13 to 17, an intensive executive training program focused on recent developments in case law and changes effected by the America Invents Act.  More than two dozen lawyers came to Duke Law for the program, Co-sponsored by the American Intellectual Property Law Association.  Dozens of administrative patent judges Continue Reading »

Judicial Studies Center receives $5 million grant from The Duke Endowment

Posted on June 4, 2013

The Duke Endowment has committed $5 million to the Duke University School of Law to support the operations of its Center for Judicial Studies, President Richard H. Brodhead announced on Wednesday. “We’re pleased to receive such generous support from The Duke Endowment for this important program,” said Brodhead. “The Center for Judicial Studies is an outstanding example of the way Continue Reading »

Judicial Studies Center conference focuses on future of multidistrict litigation

Posted on May 8, 2013

Duke’s Center for Judicial Studies hosted a conference on the future of multidistrict litigation (MDL) on May 2 and 3, in Washington D.C.  Part of the center’s “Bench-Bar-Academy Distinguished Lawyers’ Series,” the event allowed more than 50 academics and attorneys to offer input to judges, transferee judges, and staff from the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Jurisdiction (JPML) Continue Reading »

Judicial Studies Center conference examines technology-assisted ediscovery review

Posted on April 23, 2013

The Judicial Studies Center held a conference on “Technology-Assisted Ediscovery Review” (predictive coding) on April 19 in Washington D.C.  About 80 prominent jurists, government officials, senior lawyers, technical experts, and academics attended the invitation-only conference, the latest in the center’s “Bench-Bar-Academy Distinguished Lawyers’ Series,” which address emerging legal issues and develop consensus positions that will guide government Continue Reading »

Rabiej leads preview of Judicial Studies Center’s upcoming Technology Assisted Review Conference

Posted on April 15, 2013

On April 4, 2013, John Rabiej, director of Duke Law’s Center for Judicial Studies, led a panel discussion of lawyers and experts on technology-assisted ediscovery review (predictive coding) at the meeting of the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Civil Rules at the University of Oklahoma.   In addition to Rabiej, the panel included Professor Gordon Cormack (University of Continue Reading »

Levy brings focus on judicial process and passion for teaching to associate professor position

Posted on February 5, 2013

Marin K. Levy, whose scholarly interests include civil procedure, judicial administration, federal courts, remedies, and bioethics, joined the governing faculty on Jan. 1 as associate professor of law. Levy first joined the Duke Law faculty as a lecturing fellow in 2009; for the past year she has served as a visiting associate professor of law. Continue Reading »